P r o j e c t X

ProjectX's First Contributors

One of ProjectX’s core values is to promote work from the community. As we were putting together our site, projectx.is, we realised we needed images. Of course, we didn’t need to hit up Unsplash. Nor did we need to look to IG.

We are a community of artists. Our gratification comes from sharing the art that we create. So to break the ice, we sent to the team a call for photographs to adorn our new site.

Here’s a short montage of photographs from our first contributors.

ProjectX featured images



Meet the Contributors

Craig

Portrait of Craig

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

After a long time away from making photographs that weren’t for a brief or specific job, I started to make a series of photographs of landscapes. I was looking a lot at the work of Hiroshi Sugimoto, Yamamoto Masao and Matt Mahurin and also Japanese art and print making.

I wanted to strip my photography back to very simple elements such as line and form so that within these simple frames small incidents took on larger significance. A broken branch on the edge of a ploughed field, the curve left by a car wheel on the land or other interventions began to be a way of not only examining photography, but also the politics of the British landscape.

Where are you based?

UK

Bio


Dru

Portrait

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

Where are you based?

Bio

See Dru’s contribution. Click on Reach Out in the top menu.


Mark

Portrait of Mark in Bhutan

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

Pain. If I had to sum up in one word why this body of work was never finished. Melancholy would be the second word if I needed to be verbose.

I originally posted pieces of this photo essay three years ago. This was just after my mother passed.

I’m not sure if I’ll return to it. I consider the essay unfinished. I can’t even pin a proper title on it. I eventually want to re-sequence the images and probably write more captions (or remove all captions ha ha).

I guess death can be as complicated or as simple as we want it to be. Like everything. It’s what we make of it.

Lastly, I feel that an essay on the death of a loved one, is too cliche? Or, maybe it’s the opposite? Maybe there’s not enough on the subject—because it’s so painful?

Where are you based?

Bali

Bio

My father was an avid photographer. He gave me his Minolta SRT 101 and taught me the basics. This was around 1982 in Youngstown, Ohio.

I loved that camera because I could manually play with exposures and make my photos look different from everyone elses. I passed it down to my daughter who still uses it today.

I’ve contributed to microstock companies, Airbnb Plus, and editorial magazines. I run a donation-based street photography tour in Ubud. I had one film photograph (scanned negative) displayed in Milan at the Contrasto Gallery as a finalist.

I’m based in Bali. I feed stray dogs and cats.

caught my eye

Bali Street Photographer


Nige’

Portrait

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

I began working on what essentially feels like a lifelong project which subsequently evolved into the body of work: Where The Land Meets The Sea. Without the use of a tripod I began capturing my emotional response to the mood so evocative of the coast during annual spring and/or autumn coastal sojourns. “I find a piece of my soul every time I visit the sea.”

During that time, the final piece of the creative jigsaw was discovered almost by accident when I began adding textures to the static images, too. Ultimately, this project was further developed, and enriched, when American artist, Michelle Firment Reid saw my work and began to create her own interpretations based on them that resulted in a joint exhibition in Tulsa, Oklahoma during the summer of 2012. Partly as a reaction to seeing Firment Reid’s more abstract interpretations, and partly due to expanding my own emotional response to the coast, I began taking the no-tripod rule a little further and began experimenting with much longer exposures; I often made these at twilight and beyond, when I’d normally pack up and return to the cottage/s. So, I gradually began accumulating these images in the latter part of the decade during very occasional visits to gloriously deserted coastline but, for various reasons, never actually processed any of them!

Somewhat ironically, therefore, when faced with this question from ProjectX, I began to revisit some of these images.

Where are you based?

Bio

See Nige’s contribution.


Ushi

Portrait

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

Having recently made the tree-change from Melbourne to North East Victoria I’ve had to make a change to what I photograph.

Since relocating to the country, I’ve been exploring the local landscapes and trying to find my own personal style.

I’d rather photograph a feeling or an emotion rather than what is simply presented in front of me….so this is a project that I’ve only just started and, is still a work in process as I find my photographic feet’ here.

Ordinarily landscape photography doesn’t make my heart sing (whereas put me into a street full of people….)

So I guess it’s a process of discovery as to making photos of my new surroundings in a new and more creative way. Something that speaks to me…..

Where are you based?

Bio


Vasilis

Portrait

Tell us a bit about the project, for example why you never finished it or how you would return to it after a period of time away from it.

My neighborhood is a project about the area i live. But i never consider a project as a beginning or as an end. I don’t believe in that! Always random is the real god in art or in creation. I just let things to happen without following a certain order. Sometimes you just follow the road and what ever comes…so the man with the pigeons was there for many years, slowly taking the form of death in his loneliness but the pigeons were the hope that he will fly soon with them.

Where are you based?

Bio

See Vasilis’ contribution.


We hope you enjoyed our inaugural round of contributions. Don’t worry, there will be much more to come.

Now, don’t be shy. Start a comment thread below, reach out to the contributors, and be a contributor yourself!

Featured photo: Iris by Nige’ Ollis.


i feed the stray dogs and cats of bali.